Publications list

Found 10 results
Author Title [ Type(Desc)] Year
Filters: Author is Ong, Nicole T.  [Clear All Filters]
Book Chapter
N. T. Ong and Hodges, N. J., Mixing it up a little. How to schedule observational practice, in Skill Acquisition in Sport: Research, Theory and Practice, 2nd edition, 2nd ed., N. J. Hodges and Williams, A. M., Eds. London: Routledge/Taylor&Francis, 2012, pp. 22-39.
Conference Paper
N. J. Hodges, Ong, N. T., Larssen, B. C., and Lim, S. B., What Observation of Motor Skills Does and Does Not Teach Us, in BIO Web of Conferences, 2011, vol. 1, p. 00034.
Journal Article
N. T. Ong and Hodges, N. J., Absence of after-effects for observers after watching a visuomotor adaptation, Experimental Brain Research, vol. 205, no. 3, pp. 325 - 334, 2010.
N. T. Ong and Hodges, N. J., Balancing Our Perceptions of the Efficacy of Success-Based Feedback Manipulations on Motor Learning, Journal of Motor Behavior, vol. online, pp. 1-17, 2017.
N. T. Ong, Larssen, B. C., and Hodges, N. J., In the absence of physical practice, observation and imagery do not result in the updating of internal models for aiming, Experimental Brain Research, 2012.
N. T. Ong, Lohse, K., and Hodges, N. J., Manipulating target size influences perceptions of success when learning a dart-throwing skill but does not impact retention, Frontiers in Psychology: Movement Science and Sport Psychology, 2015.
N. T. Ong, Bowcock, A., and Hodges, N. J., Manipulations to the Timing and Type of Instructions to Examine Motor Skill Performance Under Pressure, Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 1, pp. 1-13, 2010.
N. T. Ong, Hawke, J., and Hodges, N. J., Target Size Manipulations Affect Error-Processing Duration and Success Perceptions but not Behavioural Indices of Learning, Brain Sciences, vol. 9, no. 5, p. 119, 2019.
N. T. Ong, Lohse, K., Chua, R., Sinnett, S., and Hodges, N. J., A Test of Motor Skill-Specific Action Embodiment in Ice-hockey Players, Acta Psychologia, 2014.
B. C. Larssen, Ong, N. T., and Hodges, N. J., Watch and Learn: Seeing Is Better than Doing when Acquiring Consecutive Motor Tasks, PLoS ONE, vol. 7, no. 6, p. e38938, 2012.